Course Introduction

FSP 501: Forensic Odontology

  • Course Outline
  • Curriculum
  • FAQ
  • Case Studies
  • Reviews

June Batch 2024

Last Date to Register : 25th June 2024

The Forensic Odontology Online Course by SIFS India is accurately designed to equip you with skills and knowledge about the intersection of dentistry and forensic investigation and using dental evidence to solve crime mysteries.

You will learn how dental evidence and records can help in human identification, bite mark analysis, and disaster victim identification.

All the pre-recorded sessions are delivered by expert faculty focusing on harnessing the power of teeth to solve complex cases.

This course comprises three levels: Level 1 (certificate), Level 2 (diploma), and Level 3 (Post Graduate Diploma), and the entire curriculum is divided among these levels.

A few of the topics you will learn about are: role of a forensic odontologist, endodontic anatomy of teeth, teeth development, deciduous and permanent teeth, occlusion development, types of dental anomalies, principles of dental identification, age estimation using dentition, types of mass disasters, disaster victim identification, bite mark analysis, collection and preservation of bite marks, types of child abuse, role of dentistry in preventing child abuse, and legal factors associated with bite mark evidence.

So enroll now to acquire the skills to become a sought-after forensic odontologist.

Course Benefits

Enrolling in this course will equip you with crucial skills required in dental identification and bite mark analysis using dental evidence. This profound knowledge of techniques to carry out human identification using dental evidence opens doors to several career opportunities, like working in forensic labs, collaborating with law enforcement agencies and disaster response teams, and assisting in solving complex cases.

Course Outcome

Upon successful completion of this course, you will gain expertise to identify individuals through their dental remains, analyze dental records, and implement the principles of dental identification and bite mark interpretation within a legal framework, making a significant impact in the field of forensic odontology.

Course Highlights

- Pre-recorded sessions with working knowledge of forensic odontology tools

- Expert instructors with extensive backgrounds in forensic odontology and bite mark analysis

- Industry-specific and comprehensive study material and reference books

- Community of forensic odontologists and experts

- Enhanced job prospects through professional networking

  • Level I : Forensic Odontology

    MODULE 1 – FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY

    This module explores the field of forensic odontology, its historical evolution, the qualifications essential for forensic dentists, the career scope of working as a forensic odontologist, the role played by forensic odontologists at the intersection of medicine and law, and the significance of forensic odontology in legal investigations and medical contexts.

    MODULE 2 – HUMAN TOOTH IDENTIFICATION

    In this module, you will learn about the history, purpose, and principles of human tooth identification and the forensic significance of dental identification, including comparative and reconstructive aspects. Comparative dental identification involves postmortem and antemortem dental examinations and their comparison, whereas reconstructive dental identification involves factors like sex, age, and race.

    The use of DNA profiling as a valuable tool in identification processes is highlighted, along with factors contributing to dental identification in forensic contexts like palatal rugae, medical conditions, treatments, habits, and occupational hazards.

    MODULE 3 – FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY IN MASS DISASTERS AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    This module focuses on the role of forensic odontology in cases of mass disasters and the types of mass disasters, categorizing them into natural disasters, man-made disasters, closed types, open types, mixed, ongoing, and finite.

    You will also learn about disaster scene management, focusing on the scene of the crime, the event perimeter, GPS technology for searching, security and safety measures, interagency relationships, and the identification section. Special attention is given to the odontology section, which involves dental teams (first, second or postmortem unit, third or antemortem unit, and fourth), each designated for different purposes in disaster victim identification (DVI) planning.

    The process of disaster victim identification (DVI), including planning, retrieval of dental records, recovery and collection of remnants, documentation, postmortem analysis, examination of the oral cavity, dissection techniques, antemortem dental records, dental reconciliation, comparison of antemortem and postmortem records, the use of technology in mass fatality incidents, including computer-assisted software and digital data, and digital and conventional images, along with problems that arise during the comparison of records.

    MODULE 4 – BITE MARKS

    In this module, you gain insights about human bite marks, their history, nature (including cutaneous and prototypical bite marks), the characteristics of bite marks (class and individual characteristics), injuries that simulate bite marks, and the mechanism of bite marks (components and responses to injuries caused).

    The module also covers bite marks classification systems on the basis of causation, intensity (definite, amorous, modified aggressive, aggressive, and very aggressive), time of death (antemortem, perimortem, and postmortem), practical application (class I, class II, class III, and class IV), bite mark injury (hemorrhage, abrasion, bruise, laceration, avulsion, and artifacts), presence on food stuffs (types I, II, and III), and response of the sufferer (offensive and defensive).

    The discussion further extends to the impression and study casts and factors influencing bite mark injuries, including status of the recipient, force with which bite has been made, psychological status of the recipient of the bite mark, gender of the biter or recipient, anatomical site variability, victim's age, kind of skin (hard or loose), presence or absence of tooth or teeth, size of the tooth or teeth, time of injury produced, presence of any layer of clothing on the skin, nature of substrates, and forensic significance (physical, biological, and psychological evidence).

    MODULE 5 – BITE MARK ANALYSIS

    In this module, you will learn about bite mark investigation, its historical overview, the steps involved in bite mark analysis, including recognition of bite marks (based on the shape of teeth, type of wound, and sites of teeth), and the documentation and collection of evidence from both victims and suspects. Preservation methods for bite marks on living victims, deceased bodies, distorted skin or tissues, and edible items, along with bite mark casting techniques, including dental stone, permlastic polyvinylsiloxane (PVS), and silicon-based materials, are also discussed.

    The module then focuses on bitemark analysis, involving injury description, principles and guidelines of bite mark analysis, analysis techniques (biological and physical), bite mark comparison, and the significance and limitations of the bite mark evidence in forensic investigations.

  • Level II : Forensic Odontology

    MODULE 1 – FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY

    This module explores the field of forensic odontology, its historical evolution, the qualifications essential for forensic dentists, the career scope of working as a forensic odontologist, the role played by forensic odontologists at the intersection of medicine and law, and the significance of forensic odontology in legal investigations and medical contexts.

    MODULE 2 – HUMAN TOOTH IDENTIFICATION

    In this module, you will learn about the history, purpose, and principles of human tooth identification and the forensic significance of dental identification, including comparative and reconstructive aspects. Comparative dental identification involves postmortem and antemortem dental examinations and their comparison, whereas reconstructive dental identification involves factors like sex, age, and race.

    The use of DNA profiling as a valuable tool in identification processes is highlighted, along with factors contributing to dental identification in forensic contexts like palatal rugae, medical conditions, treatments, habits, and occupational hazards.

    MODULE 3 – AGE ESTIMATION

    This module focuses on the history and principles of age estimation using dentition, including various factors such as tooth development, incremental structures in the tooth crown, variations in the pulpodentinal complex, chemical composition alterations, fluorescence of dental hard tissues, epidemiological measures, attrition, and tooth mineralization.

    The need for age estimation, chronological age estimation, and dentition as age indicators covers the dental development process and dental age assessment. The process of dental age estimation is discussed for prenatal, neonatal, early postnatal periods, children, adolescents, and adults.

    Morphological methods for assessing age in adults, age-related and progressive changes in teeth, histological changes, biochemical changes (amino acid racemization), and radiological methods for age estimation are explored, along with the steps, guidelines, and standards for the age estimation process.

    MODULE 4 – FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY IN MASS DISASTERS AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    This module focuses on the role of forensic odontology in cases of mass disasters and the types of mass disasters, categorizing them into natural disasters, man-made disasters, closed types, open types, mixed, ongoing, and finite.

    You will also learn about disaster scene management, focusing on the scene of the crime, the event perimeter, GPS technology for searching, security and safety measures, interagency relationships, and the identification section. Special attention is given to the odontology section, which involves dental teams (first, second or postmortem unit, third or antemortem unit, and fourth), each designated for different purposes in disaster victim identification (DVI) planning.

    The process of disaster victim identification (DVI), including planning, retrieval of dental records, recovery and collection of remnants, documentation, postmortem analysis, examination of the oral cavity, dissection techniques, antemortem dental records, dental reconciliation, comparison of antemortem and postmortem records, the use of technology in mass fatality incidents, including computer-assisted software and digital data, and digital and conventional images, along with problems that arise during the comparison of records.

    MODULE 5 – BITE MARKS

    In this module, you gain insights about human bite marks, their history, nature (including cutaneous and prototypical bite marks), the characteristics of bite marks (class and individual characteristics), injuries that simulate bite marks, and the mechanism of bite marks (components and responses to injuries caused).

    The module also covers bite marks classification systems on the basis of causation, intensity (definite, amorous, modified aggressive, aggressive, and very aggressive), time of death (antemortem, perimortem, and postmortem), practical application (class I, class II, class III, and class IV), bite mark injury (hemorrhage, abrasion, bruise, laceration, avulsion, and artifacts), presence on food stuffs (types I, II, and III), and response of the sufferer (offensive and defensive).

    The discussion further extends to the impression and study casts and factors influencing bite mark injuries, including status of the recipient, force with which bite has been made, psychological status of the recipient of the bite mark, gender of the biter or recipient, anatomical site variability, victim's age, kind of skin (hard or loose), presence or absence of tooth or teeth, size of the tooth or teeth, time of injury produced, presence of any layer of clothing on the skin, nature of substrates, and forensic significance (physical, biological, and psychological evidence).

    MODULE 6 – BITE MARK ANALYSIS

    In this module, you will learn about bite mark investigation, its historical overview, the steps involved in bite mark analysis, including recognition of bite marks (based on the shape of teeth, type of wound, and sites of teeth), and the documentation and collection of evidence from both victims and suspects. Preservation methods for bite marks on living victims, deceased bodies, distorted skin or tissues, and edible items, along with bite mark casting techniques, including dental stone, permlastic polyvinylsiloxane (PVS), and silicon-based materials, are also discussed.

    The module then focuses on bitemark analysis, involving injury description, principles and guidelines of bite mark analysis, analysis techniques (biological and physical), bite mark comparison, and the significance and limitations of the bite mark evidence in forensic investigations.

    MODULE 7 – ROLE OF DENTISTRY IN DETECTING AND PREVENTING CHILD ABUSE

    This module covers the domain of child abuse within the dental context, its historical perspective, and types of child abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and dental neglect. The module also outlines the clinical symptoms of child abuse, the role of dentists in appropriate intervention, documentation, and reporting of suspicious cases, and knowledge about Prevent Abuse and Neglect Through Dental Awareness (P.A.N.D.A.), highlighting the role of the dental community in spreading awareness and preventing child abuse through proactive measures.

    MODULE 8 – LEGAL ISSUES CONCERNING BITE MARK EVIDENCE

    In this module, you will learn about the legal aspects of evidence collection in forensic odontology and its use in court, the Fourth Amendment's implications on arrest, search, and seizure, along with the exclusionary rule and search warrant details.

    The module covers the admissibility of expert evidence based on relevancy and reliability, the National Academy of Science's 2009 review of bite mark evidence, types of dental testimony by dentists, qualifications needed for expert testimony on bite mark evidence, the court’s stance on admitting bite mark opinions, the scientific limitations of bite mark testimony, and instances where wrongful bite mark testimonies were overturned by DNA evidence.

  • Level III : Forensic Odontology

    MODULE 1 - FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY

    This module explores the field of forensic odontology, its historical evolution, the qualifications essential for forensic dentists, the career scope of working as a forensic odontologist, the role played by forensic odontologists at the intersection of medicine and law, and the significance of forensic odontology in legal investigations and medical contexts.

    MODULE 2 - HUMAN TOOTH DEVELOPMENT

    In this module, you will learn about the endodontic anatomy of teeth, covering the morphological and anatomical features of both crown and root portions; the teeth development process, including early and later tooth development, along with tooth root formation; the types of teeth and their functions; and the teeth eruption sequence, covering primary and permanent dentition teeth, along with the influence of external and internal forces on eruption sequences.

    The module also covers notation systems used in dentistry, including the Universal Numbering System, Zsigmondy Numbering System, and FDI Numbering System; shedding of teeth, both primary and permanent; pattern and mechanism of shedding; and clinical considerations, including remnants of deciduous teeth, primary tooth retainment, and submerged deciduous teeth, with insights into dental anomalies and their forensic significance.

    MODULE 3 - DECIDUOUS AND PERMANENT TEETH

    This module covers an in-depth examination of deciduous and permanent teeth, including a description of individual deciduous and permanent teeth and the chronology of their development. The concept of mixed dentition is covered, as are the distinctions between deciduous and permanent teeth and the forensic significance of the examination of both deciduous and permanent teeth.

    MODULE 4 - OCCLUSION

    This module highlights the topic of occlusion development, starting from the predentate period to deciduous dentition, including an overview of primary occlusion, eruption chronology, and characteristic features of occlusion in deciduous dentition, the mixed dentition stage (6–12 years of age), and the concept of permanent dentition. The module then focuses on factors influencing occlusion (genetic, environmental, muscular pressure, and age-related changes), relations between cusp, fossa, and marginal ridge, along with lateral, protrusive, and retrusive movements, and the biomechanics of chewing function.

    The concept of malocclusion is taught along with its classification system, including angle, skeletal, and Simon’s classifications. The module concludes by focusing on the clinical significance of normal occlusion, encompassing skeletal inconsistencies and parafunctional habits.

    MODULE 5 - DENTAL ANOMALIES

    This module deals with dental anomalies as per their teeth size (microdontia and macrodontia), teeth number (anodontia, hypodontia, oligodontia, and hyperdontia or supernumerary teeth), and teeth shape (globodontia, taurodontia, dilacerations, concrescence, fusion, gemination, dens invaginatus, dens evaginations, talon's cusp, other accessory cusp and tubercles, supernumerary root, enamel pearls, enamel extensions, attrition, abrasion, and erosion).

    The module also covers structural anomalies, including amelogenesis imperfecta, enamel hypoplasia, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dentin dysplasia, and regional odontodysplasia. The anomalies related to jaws (agnathia, micrognathia, macrognathia, and facial hemihypertrophy), anomalies based on tooth color, and developmental anomalies of the gingiva (fibromatosis gingivae and retrocuspid papilla) are also discussed.

    Finally, the module concludes with developmental anomalies of the tongue, including aglossia, microglossia, macroglossia, ankyloglossia, and cleft tongue, along with the significant role these dental anomalies play during forensic investigation.

    MODULE 6 - HUMAN TOOTH IDENTIFICATION

    In this module, you will learn about the history, purpose, and principles of human tooth identification and the forensic significance of dental identification, including comparative and reconstructive aspects. Comparative dental identification involves postmortem and antemortem dental examinations and their comparison, whereas reconstructive dental identification involves factors like sex, age, and race.

    The use of DNA profiling as a valuable tool in identification processes is highlighted, along with factors contributing to dental identification in forensic contexts like palatal rugae, medical conditions, treatments, habits, and occupational hazards.

    MODULE 7 - AGE ESTIMATION

    This module focuses on the history and principles of age estimation using dentition, including various factors such as tooth development, incremental structures in the tooth crown, variations in the pulpodentinal complex, chemical composition alterations, fluorescence of dental hard tissues, epidemiological measures, attrition, and tooth mineralization.

    The need for age estimation, chronological age estimation, and dentition as age indicators covers the dental development process and dental age assessment. The process of dental age estimation is discussed for prenatal, neonatal, early postnatal periods, children, adolescents, and adults.

    Morphological methods for assessing age in adults, age-related and progressive changes in teeth, histological changes, biochemical changes (amino acid racemization), and radiological methods for age estimation are explored, along with the steps, guidelines, and standards for the age estimation process.

    MODULE 8 - FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY IN MASS DISASTERS AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    This module focuses on the role of forensic odontology in cases of mass disasters and the types of mass disasters, categorizing them into natural disasters, man-made disasters, closed types, open types, mixed, ongoing, and finite.

    You will also learn about disaster scene management, focusing on the scene of the crime, the event perimeter, GPS technology for searching, security and safety measures, interagency relationships, and the identification section. Special attention is given to the odontology section, which involves dental teams (first, second or postmortem unit, third or antemortem unit, and fourth), each designated for different purposes in disaster victim identification (DVI) planning.

    The process of disaster victim identification (DVI), including planning, retrieval of dental records, recovery and collection of remnants, documentation, postmortem analysis, examination of the oral cavity, dissection techniques, antemortem dental records, dental reconciliation, comparison of antemortem and postmortem records, the use of technology in mass fatality incidents, including computer-assisted software and digital data, and digital and conventional images, along with problems that arise during the comparison of records.

    MODULE 9 - BITE MARKS

    In this module, you gain insights about human bite marks, their history, nature (including cutaneous and prototypical bite marks), the characteristics of bite marks (class and individual characteristics), injuries that simulate bite marks, and the mechanism of bite marks (components and responses to injuries caused).

    The module also covers bite marks classification systems on the basis of causation, intensity (definite, amorous, modified aggressive, aggressive, and very aggressive), time of death (antemortem, perimortem, and postmortem), practical application (class I, class II, class III, and class IV), bite mark injury (hemorrhage, abrasion, bruise, laceration, avulsion, and artifacts), presence on food stuffs (types I, II, and III), and response of the sufferer (offensive and defensive).

    The discussion further extends to the impression and study casts and factors influencing bite mark injuries, including status of the recipient, force with which bite has been made, psychological status of the recipient of the bite mark, gender of the biter or recipient, anatomical site variability, victim's age, kind of skin (hard or loose), presence or absence of tooth or teeth, size of the tooth or teeth, time of injury produced, presence of any layer of clothing on the skin, nature of substrates, and forensic significance (physical, biological, and psychological evidence).

    MODULE 10 - BITE MARK ANALYSIS

    In this module, you will learn about bite mark investigation, its historical overview, the steps involved in bite mark analysis, including recognition of bite marks (based on the shape of teeth, type of wound, and sites of teeth), and the documentation and collection of evidence from both victims and suspects. Preservation methods for bite marks on living victims, deceased bodies, distorted skin or tissues, and edible items, along with bite mark casting techniques, including dental stone, permlastic polyvinylsiloxane (PVS), and silicon-based materials, are also discussed.

    The module then focuses on bitemark analysis, involving injury description, principles and guidelines of bite mark analysis, analysis techniques (biological and physical), bite mark comparison, and the significance and limitations of the bite mark evidence in forensic investigations.

    MODULE 11 - ROLE OF DENTISTRY IN DETECTING AND PREVENTING CHILD ABUSE

    This module covers the domain of child abuse within the dental context, its historical perspective, and types of child abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and dental neglect. The module also outlines the clinical symptoms of child abuse, the role of dentists in appropriate intervention, documentation, and reporting of suspicious cases, and knowledge about Prevent Abuse and Neglect Through Dental Awareness (P.A.N.D.A.), highlighting the role of the dental community in spreading awareness and preventing child abuse through proactive measures.

    MODULE 12 - LEGAL ISSUES CONCERNING BITE MARK EVIDENCE

    In this module, you will learn about the legal aspects of evidence collection in forensic odontology and its use in court, the Fourth Amendment's implications on arrest, search, and seizure, along with the exclusionary rule and search warrant details.

    The module covers the admissibility of expert evidence based on relevancy and reliability, the National Academy of Science's 2009 review of bite mark evidence, types of dental testimony by dentists, qualifications needed for expert testimony on bite mark evidence, the court’s stance on admitting bite mark opinions, the scientific limitations of bite mark testimony, and instances where wrongful bite mark testimonies were overturned by DNA evidence.

  • What steps should I follow to enroll in this online course?

    To enroll, click on the “Register for Course” option available on the right side of the screen, followed by the provided instructions and payment procedure.

  • Can I pay directly to the bank account of SIFS India?

    Yes, you have the option to make a direct payment to the bank account of SIFS India;, all you have to do is write an email at education@sifs.in requesting the bank details. 

  • Which documents I have to upload at the time of enrollment?

    Academic Qualification Documents, Professional Qualification Certificates, and National ID Proof or Passport Copy are required at the time of enrollment.  

  • What if I am unable to upload my documents?

    Kindly send your necessary documents with proof of payment to admission@sifs.in.

  • How will I receive confirmation once I have completed the payment procedure?

    An Admission Confirmation email will be sent with your portal credentials once the proof of payment and application form with all the necessary documents are received at admission@sifs.in.

  • How do I login to the portal for my online course?

    To login, visit the portal at the given link: https://www.sifs.in/student and enter your login credentials, i.e., your username and password shared via email. 

  • What study material access will I have after logging into the portal?

    After logging into the portal, you will have access to reading material, reference eBooks, and e-research papers.

  • Will I receive any assignments during my course duration?

    Yes, all your assignments, projects, case studies and practice tests will be assigned to you through your portal as per the level you will be enrolled in.

  • What technical prerequisites are necessary for an online course?

    You can easily access our online course on mobile / tablet devices. We highly recommend that you use your desktop or laptop and a reliable internet connection for a better view.

  • Will there be any exams after completing the course?

    Yes, there will be an online exam after completing the course.

  • Will I receive any certificates after completing the online course?

    Yes, upon successful completion of the course, you will receive a certificate and marksheet, which can be a valuable addition to your resume and may enhance your career prospects in the field.

  • Where to contact in case of any queries or technical support?

    Write to us at admission@sifs.in, call: +91-1147074263, or WhatsApp: +91-7303913002.

Gordon Hay Case Study

In 1967, a 15-year-old girl named Linda Peacock was reported missing in a Scottish town called Biggar, and a few days later, her body was discovered in a local cemetery.

She was brutally beaten, her blouse and bra were messed up, there was a strange bruise on her right breast, and she was strangled to death. This bruise was identified as a bite mark.

To analyze the mark so that it could assist in catching the killer, odontologist Dr. Warren Harvey was roped in for an investigation.

During the investigation, a witness came forward and claimed to have seen the victim with a man at around 10 p.m. at the cemetery on the day of Linda’s disappearance.

The witness said that as the girl was talking normally to the man, it appeared they both knew each other, so there was nothing to inquire about.

Hence, no action was taken from the witness's side even after hearing the girl’s screams for 20 minutes.

The odontological examination of the bite mark revealed that there is a unique unevenness in the offender’s teeth.

With the available information about the bite mark and that provided by the witness, a strategic search was implemented that included townspeople and, thereafter, local detention center inmates.

Several dental impressions of the inmates were taken for comparison with the bite mark on the victim’s body.

Dr. Harvey, after an examination, narrowed down the list to five suspects.

At this stage, Keith Simpson, a pathologist, joined the investigating team for help. Gordon Hay, a 17-year-old boy, was identified as the creator of the bite mark.

Hay was detained for breaking into a factory after issues with authority figures.

His dental impressions were examined, and there were two pits in one of his teeth caused by a disorder called hypocalcination.

These pits, upon examination, matched the bite mark on the victim’s breast, and Hay was therefore convicted.

Sannidhi D D

5

This was a great experience to know more things and explore more knowledge about the odontology which is helpful for the forensic science student and even for much more broad use .Thank you so much sir for brushing up us to shine later in future. And I am going to surely use the knowledge in my field as much as possible and effective .

Rithiksha Ramesh

5

The course provided was amazing I could understand the things and learnt many things. Looking forward for more.

Veluvali Sam Sharon Arnold

4

Really enjoyed the covey learning structure, excellent way to bring the team together...

Anindita Palit

4

Very nice course it was and I am too satisfacted , really informative

 

Instructors

Dr. Akhil S Shetty

Dr. Akhil S Shetty

Forensic Instructor
Dr. Deepak V.

Dr. Deepak V.

Dentist, Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology
Dr. Ranjeet Singh

Dr. Ranjeet Singh

Managing Director

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